City support for hospital growth plan

Maitland Private Hospital is poised to develop an intensive care unit and chemotherapy suiteafter Maitland councilvoted to refer expansion plans to the Joint Regional Planning Panel.
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Councillors voted unanimously on Tuesday night to make a submission to the panel indicating its support for the proposa,l which will include a new 25-bed surgical ward, alterations to incorporate anintensive care unit and achemotherapy ward.

The project would also include the demolition of some houses to accommodate 28 additional car parking spaces.

The application has been referred to the planning panel because the proposed cost of the development is more than $5million.The proposal, if approved, will result in 172 hospital beds on site.

Councillors had little debate on the matter, which was moved by Cr Peter Garnham.He said council hadalways known that the private hospital, on the corner of Chisholm Road and the New England Highway at East Maitland, would continue to grow.

Cr Arch Humphery said the application was an indication of the demand for health services in the Maitland area. He said there hadbeen difficulty developing the facility in the pastdue tosome site constraints.

Fairfax Media reported in May thatMaitland Private Hospital was toreceive a $25 million upgrade that wouldinclude an intensive care unit and a chemotherapy suite,two theatres and associated services, a new 24-bed ward and more parking.The upgrade is expected to create 50 more jobs in the hospital.

The announcement came after Healthe Care, the company that owns the hospital, was sold to China’sLuye Medical Group.Healthe Care CEO Steve Atkins said the upgrade wouldmake chemotherapy and intensive caremore accessible for people in Maitland and the Upper Hunter.The additionis part of a wider cancer project at thehospital.

Mr Atkins told Fairfax Media in Maythe plan wasto acquire houses behind the hospital to transform into a cancer institute.“We’re keen to develop a more comprehensive cancer service, which we’re really excited about,” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Senator’s larceny charge proven but dismissed

No conviction: Barrister Peter King, left, and Senator Rod Culleton, right, leave Armidale Local Court. Photo: Breanna Chillingworth
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It was ‘foolish’Magistrate Michael Holmes has found the larceny charge proven butdismissed itunder Section 10A, meaning Rod Culleton will be free to continue as a senator for Western Australia.

Senator Rod Culleton says the only reason he dropped the application to have the larcenycase heard by a jury was because due to a plea deal.

Speaking outside Armidale Local Court on Tuesday, Mr Culleton said it was a “favourable outcome” after he was handed a Section 10A dismissal fora larceny charge.

“It’s been at huge expense, not only to my family but to a number of parties over $7.50 of a key, a key that I put the value too,” he told media.

Senator Rod CulletonSenator Rod Culleton admits he was “foolish” to take tow truck key during dispute in #Guyra in 2014. He’s escaped conviction today @The_NDLpic.twitter南京夜网/ikUhd2NElY

— BreannaChillingworth (@breannachill) October 25, 2016Barrister Peter King says Senator Rod Culleton has been “exonerated” in #Armidale court after escaping conviction for larceny @The_NDLpic.twitter南京夜网/wEAgmsmW21

— BreannaChillingworth (@breannachill) October 25, 2016Barrister says Culleton ‘exonerated’Culleton’s barrister Peter King says his client’s name has been cleared.

“I’m very pleased to say that Rod Culleton has been completely exonerated in the court today and the charges against him have been dismissed,” he said outstide Armidale Local Court.

“On the basis he was to be completely exonerated and he was, and indeed the magistrate held that he was a man of very good character.”

No convictionMagistrate Michael Holmes has found the larceny charge proven butdismissed itunder Section 10A, meaning Rod Culleton will be free to continue as a senator for Western Australia.

In sentencing, Mr Holmes said Culleton acted “foolishly” during the dispute in 2014.

In court: WA Senator Rod Culleton outside Armidale Local Court earlier this year. Photo: Matt Bedford

Mr Holmes said he took into account the extenuating delays in the case by Culleton, his good character, family ties and his work.

“The trivial nature of the offence … but I do find that you acted somewhat foolishly,” he told Culleton.

Mr Holmes ordered Culleton to pay $322.85in compensation to the tow truck driver.

Guilty pleaRod Culleton has pleaded guilty to stealing a tow truck driver’s key after an altercation in April 2014.

Barrister Peter King said his client was acting in “self-defence” when the key was “flung” during the confrontation on April 11 in Guyra.

“[His actions] was to prevent a criminal trespass to his vehicle and the property on which he was located,” he told the court.

Application to have case heard by a juryWA ONE Nation senator Rod Culleton will try and have a charge he stole a towtruck driver’s key in Guyra heard before a jury.

The newly-elected senator appeared in Armidale Local Court on Tuesday morning where the case was set down for hearing before the court was told he wants the matter dealt with in the district court.

Mr Culleton’s barrister Peter King lodged an application in the court to have the matter which he says is strictly indictable heard by a jury.

In court: WA Senator Rod Culleton outside Armidale Local Court earlier this year. Photo: Matt Bedford

But Magistrate Michael Holmes is refusing to grant the application.

“This was never flagged, the matter is listed for hearing today,” he told the court.

“This was received yesterday morning at this courthouse …not very satisfactory is it.

“Iwould have expected more courtesy to the court.”

For the charge to be dealt with in the district court the larceny charge must relate to an item worth more than $5000.

Mr Holmes questioned the application and said Mr Culleton had been quoted in the mediasaying the charge related to “a $7.50 key”.

“He now puts the value at over $5000,” Mr Holmes said examining the papers.

“I think the charge sets the value of the obtaining the key the value of … just say about $300.

“That’s what the crown is relying on for the purposes of these proceedings.

“It is not a proper case for a jury.”

Mr King said there were two issues in the case and it should be heard before a jury.

Barrister Peter King

“There’s been … fair to say abeefing up of the prosecution case,” Mr King told the court.

Mr Culleton has pleaded not guilty to the charge of stealing the key in Guyra on April 11, 2014.

According to court documents, Culleton is accused of the theft of a key for a Peterbuilt heavy haulage tow truck between 8am and 10am.

Court papers state the property is worth $322.85, with the tow truck owner seeking compensation for the purchase and installation costs after he was forced to get a new ignition switch and door locks.

The court has been told the prosecution has obtained further evidence with four extra statements served on the defence in the lead-up to the hearing, including two new statements.

The prosecutor said “discussions” were ongoing but “majority” of the prosecution witnesses were ready for the hearing today.

Northern Daily Leader

Same-sex marriage plebiscite was a ‘shitty political deal’ between Liberal factions: Christine Forster

Christine Forster is a member of the City of Sydney council. Photo: Brook MitchellTony Abbott’s sister Christine Forster has described the stalled same-sex marriage plebiscite as a “shitty political deal” struck as an agreement between the Liberal Party’s conservative and moderate factions.
Nanjing Night Net

The Liberal councillor and same-sex marriage advocate made the startlingly frank admission during a heated debate of Sydney City Council on Monday night.

On Tuesday, Ms Forster told Fairfax Media she stood by her comments but stressed she was not suggesting the plebiscite was cooked up in a cross-factional “deal where Tony sat down with Malcolm, or Eric Abetz sat down with Simon Birmingham”.

“I’m saying it was a shitty deal because it was. From my point of view, it was a bad deal because I never wanted a plebiscite; I wanted a free vote in Parliament,” she said.

“But we got a plebiscite as policy and that’s the only way I see this progressing now, at least for the next few years.

“What I said [at council] was a plebiscite was a compromise agreement because it provided a way forward on same sex marriage for both the Left and the Right of the Liberal Party.”

Ms Forster – who wants to marry her long-term partner, Virginia Edwards – called on Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull earlier this year to hold a free vote. She then backed a plebiscite when it became clear it was the only path to reforming the Marriage Act in the current term of Parliament.

But her claim in an open council meeting that a plebiscite was a political deal will be a blow to Mr Turnbull, who has maintained that it was a “legitimate and democratic” way forward, rather than part of the price he paid in taking the leadership from Mr Abbott, a strident opponent of same-sex marriage.

In August last year, Cabinet Minister Christopher Pyne complained that the party room meeting that resulted in the plebiscite compromise was effectively “branch stacked” because of the inclusion of socially conservative Nationals MPs and senators.

Mr Turnbull has conceded that a plebiscite was part of the Coalition agreement with the Nationals, but never acknowledged any deal with conservative Liberals on the matter.

Labor councillor Linda Scott said Ms Forster had belled the cat on the Liberal Party’s real motivation.

“Mr Turnbull had repeatedly said that his was a principled position on holding a plebiscite. Now Cr Forster has revealed the truth about her party’s position – the plebiscite was a political deal, trading the rights of people and their families,” she said.

Ms Forster’s comments were made as council debated a motion in support of marriage equality.

She voted against a motion that congratulated Labor for opposing the plebiscite but backed a compromise motion authored by councillor Kerryn Phelps which commended the work of marriage equality campaigners, the LGTBI community and mental health professionals in raising awareness “about the real possibility of a potentially divisive and hate-filled campaign against marriage equality”.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

World’s best-perceived cities versus the reality revealed in new PwC report

London measures up to be named world’s best city. Photo: iStock Sydney also fared better in perception and than in reality. Photo: Tourism NSW
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A closest link between perception and reality: Amsterdam. Photo: iStock

Sydney is considered one of the best cities in the world, but the perception does not match up with the reality, according to a new study.

London was named the best perceived city in the world ahead of New York and Paris, in the global report that examines the perception of major cities versus the reality.

While Sydney came close to the top of the list at no.5 for “best perceived” cities, Australia’s largest city dropped to no.10 when it came to assessing what it is really like.

The report, which comprises two studies, (one on “perception” and the other on “reality” and benchmarks) rates 30 cities on a variety of factors including: corruption; health, safety, and security; innovation and entrepreneurship; transportation and infrastructure; demographics and liveability; sustainability and the natural environment; economic clout; intellectual capital and innovation; and education.

London topped the list with 5200 adults from across 16 countries scoring the city highly. Sydney was ranked No.5 behind Amsterdam and ahead of Berlin (No.6), Tokyo (No.7), Toronto (No.8), Stockholm (No.9) and Los Angeles (No.10). The study did not include any other Australian cities.

Los Angeles, Tokyo and Berlin were named among the world’s 10 best cities, however they all failed to make the top 10 when it was ranked according to quantifiable factors. Sydney also fared better in perception and than in reality, falling five spots from No.5 to No.10. Cities like New York, Berlin and Rio de Janeiro were in the same boat, with their overall perception outpacing their real-world attributes, the report states.

Cities showing the closest link between perception and reality were London, which is No. 1 in both studies, and Paris and Amsterdam, which are in the top five in both studies.

At the other end of the spectrum, Lagos ranks the lowest and Jakarta in the bottom three in both studies, and Shanghai and Moscow are at No. 21 and 22, respectively, on both lists.

The report, published last week by international consultancy firm PwC, was conducted in December 2015, before Britain’s exit from the European Union and the 2016 Olympics in Rio.

London was also named best city in the world for travellers in 2016 by TripAdvisor. It was described as “one of the world’s most admired destinations” thanks to its mix of culture, music, history, fashion, food and beer. 10 best cities: the perception10 best cities: the reality

See also: Countries with the worst and best reputations

See also: The most overrated (and underrated) cities   This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Flashback Friday: This That Festival, Live at the Foreshorephotos

Flashback Friday: This That Festival, Live at the Foreshore | photos Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers
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Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Dawn Tindall, dancing, left, on “The Other Stage”. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. “The Other Stage” Jimay Falcon, left, with Sh”Gazey, right. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Fans rock out to Baby Animals performing.Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Fans watching Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Mark Seymour performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. James Reyne performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Thousands flocked to Newcastle foreshore on Saturday for the first This That festival. Pics: Jonathan Carroll and Max Mason-Hubers

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. “The Other Stage” Jimay Falcon, right, with Dawn Tindall, left. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. “The Other Stage” Jimay Falcon, right, with Dawn Tindall, left. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Mark Seymour performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Mark Seymour performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Mark Seymour performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Mark Seymour performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday.Mark Seymour performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Mark Seymour performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. James Reyne performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. James Reyne performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. James Reyne performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. James Reyne performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. James Reyne performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Sh’Gazey, left, dancing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Dawn Tindall, dancing, left, on “The Other Stage”. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Dawn Tindall, dancing, left, on “The Other Stage”. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Dawn Tindall, dancing, left, on “The Other Stage”. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Dawn Tindall, dancing, left, on “The Other Stage”. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Fan watch Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing.Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Scenes from Live at the Foreshore music festival on Sunday. Baby Animals performing. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

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