Damian Jobson home after five months in hospitalphotos

Damian Jobson home after five months in hospital | photos HERE TO STAY: Damian Jobson, wife Brooke, sons Kynan, 6, and Zayb, 4, and the family dog Panda, together at home again after months apart. Picture: Simone De Peak
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Damian Jobson with wife Brooke and sons Kynan and Zayb back home again.

Damian Jobson and wife Brooke.

Damian with son Kynan.

Thousands were raised in an online appeal within the first hours for Damian Jobson and his family following the injury. Picture: GoFundMe

The online appeal as of Tuesday, October 25. Picture: GoFundMe

Family fun day raising funds for Damian Jobson. Cahill Oval, Belmont. Central Captain Rowan Kelly, left, and Lakes Captain Jay Sullivan, right.

Family fun day raising funds for Damian Jobson. Cahill Oval, Belmont. Central Captain Rowan Kelly, left, and Lakes Captain Jay Sullivan, right.

Cooper Cook, Shannon O’Brien, Nathen Wingg, and Jack Todd ahead of the fundraising match against Cardiff. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

The charity game against Cardiff in May, a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale captain Josh Brett holding the hand of Damien Jobson’s son Kynan ahead of the charity game against Cardiff a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale captain Josh Brett holding the hand of Damien Jobson’s son Kynan in the charity game against Cardiff a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale captain Josh Brett holding the hand of Damien Jobson’s son Kynan walking out with Brooke Jobson and youngest son Zaybe ahead of the charity game against Cardiff a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale captain Josh Brett holding the hand of Damien Jobson’s son Kynan walking out with Brooke Jobson and youngest son Zaybe ahead of the charity game against Cardiff a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale captain Josh Brett holding the hand of Damien Jobson’s son Kynan ahead of the charity game against Cardiff a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Damien Jobson’s son Kynan watching the game, also pictured is Kynan’s cousin Cruz Lanchevski, with his arms around Kynan. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Fans watching the charity match against Cardiff. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Damien Jobson’s wife Brooke with son Zaybe, left, in the team line up before kick off. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Damien Jobson’s youngest son Zaybe with his mum Brooke, both on the field before kick off for the coin toss. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Kynan Jobson scoring a try at half-time. Kynan’s team played between halves in the charity match between Windale and Cardiff held in his dad’s honour. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Kynan Jobson playing at half-time in the charity match between Windale and Cardiff held in his dad’s honour. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Kynan Jobson playing at half-time in the charity match between Windale and Cardiff held in his dad’s honour. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Kynan Jobson celebrates with his coach and teammates after scoring a try at half-time. Kynan’s team played between halves in the charity match between Windale and Cardiff held in his dad’s honour. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale reserves and fans in the charity game against Cardiff in May, a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Fans at the charity game between Windale and Cardiff a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale Eagles’ Jason Milne hits the ball up. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale Eagles’ Josh Brett, right. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Jake Backhus, right, on his way to a try. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale played Cardiff a week after the injury in a charity match. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Fans watch Windale and Cardiff. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Eagles players celebrate a try scored by Jake Backhus. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Damian Jobson’s father Alan Jobson, left, embraces the players on full time in the charity match against Cardiff. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale celebrate at full time in the charity game against Cardiff in May, a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale celebrate at full time in the charity game against Cardiff in May, a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale celebrate at full time in the charity game against Cardiff in May, a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale celebrate at full time in the charity game against Cardiff in May, a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Windale celebrate at full time in the charity game against Cardiff in May, a week after Damian’s injury. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Damian Jobson receives a visit from legendary coach Wayne Bennett in hospital.

Damian Jobson undergoing rehab as a quadriplegic at Royal Rehab in Ryde supported by his wife Brooke (right) and physiotherapist Jason Redhead (left). Picture: Wolter Peeters

Damian Jobson undergoing rehab as a quadriplegic at Royal Rehab in Ryde supported by physiotherapist Jason Redhead. Picture: Wolter Peeters

Damian Jobson undergoing rehab as a quadriplegic at Royal Rehab in Ryde supported by his wife Brooke and Physiotherapist Jason Redhead. Picture: Wolter Peeters

Damian, centre, at Royal Rehab in July with son Kynan, wife Brooke and mate Mick Bannister. Picture: Wolter Peeters

Damian, centre, at Royal Rehab in July withwife Brooke. Picture: Wolter Peeters

Damian, centre, at Royal Rehab in July withwife Brooke. Picture: Wolter Peeters

Damian Jobson undergoing rehab as a quadriplegic at Royal Rehab in Ryde supported by physiotherapist Jason Redhead. Picture: Wolter Peeters

Damian Jobson undergoing rehab as a quadriplegic at Royal Rehab in Ryde supported by wife Brooke Jobson. Picture: Wolter Peeters

TweetFacebook Damian Jobson: the journey in photosDAMIAN Jobson has returnedhome more than five months after he was rendered a quadriplegic during a game of rugby league.

The former Windale Eagles footballerwas discharged from Royal Rehab hospital in Rydeon October 21.

It was exactly five months to the day the father-of-three stepped out onto the field for a game against University of Newcastle, breaking his C4 and C5 vertebrae as he went in for a tackle against an opposing player.

After a short stint in John Hunter Hospital, the Jobsons were together once more on Tuesday, as they moved into their new Macquarie Hills home, which was recently bought and modified to accommodate Damian’s new way of life.

And what’s the verdict from the man who has captivated Newcastle and Lake Macquarie with his determination to keep going? There’s no place like home.

“It feels so good to be home,” Damian said.“It’s exciting. Anew road ahead.”

Such was Damian’s resolve to come home that in June the footballer made a goal to be home by Christmas.

“We smashed it,” Damian’s wifeBrooke said.“It was just determination, really, to keep pushing hard in physio every day and beat those goals.”

But it wasn’teasy.

The tyranny of distance inflicted an enormous toll on the family unit – even to the point youngstersKynan and Zayb questioned whether the family had a permanent home.

Four-year-old Zayb lived in Sydney with his mother, while six-year-oldKynan, who is in school, lived with a relativein Lake Macquarie.

Damian Jobson is surrounded by parents Debbie and Allan as he moves into his Macquarie Hills home on Tuesday. Picture: Simone De Peak

“I wanted to get home for the kids, more than anything, to get them back into a routine and keep living our lives,” Damian said.

The sporting tragedy continues to inspire an outpouring of community goodwill, with thousands of people digging deep to help the family in their recovery.

Asked if she was proud of her community, Damian’s mother, Debbie, said the family wouldn’t have been able to do it without the support.

“It’s been one big team,” an overjoyed Mrs Jobson said. “You need a big team to get you there, otherwise you can’t go very far at all.”

Mrs Jobson said on May 21 –the day of the accident –it was hard to picture where the family would be in the future.

“Today is like bringing your firstchild home from hospital,” she said.

“We never doubted [Damian]. He’s the child we always knew we had. Always strong and determined, we always knew he would give it his best shot.”

Damian will undergo up 18 months of physiotherapy as he continues hisrecovery.

Damian, who has some movement in his right arm, said he was considering nerve transplant surgery in a bid to regain further mobility.