Shark hotspots named

Shark hotspots named Sharks and humans – finding a way for them to co-exist isn’t easy with politician under pressure to reduce risks – however small – for the latter. Photo: Thomas P. Peschak
Nanjing Night Net

Jade Fitzpatrick, the latest victim of a shark bite in Australian waters,speaks to Seven News after he was bitten by a shark near Byron Bay. Photo: Seven News

A shark spotted swimming in the shallows near Lennox Head on October 1. Photo: Aaron Hoffman

TweetFacebookMost deadlyOnly three other states had sites that made it to the list, with Cottesloe Beach inWestern Australia leading those with four incidents, including two fatalities.Only three other states had sites that made it to the list, with Cottesloe Beach inWestern Australia leading those with four incidents, including two fatalities.

WA, though, recorded 17 deaths from sharks since 1990, the most among the states and territories, and almost triple the six deaths in NSW over the period, the data shows.

Among the other individual locations, Victoria’s Bells Beach and South Australia’s Middleton Beach, both popular sites for surfers, rounded out the top 13 shark bite hot spots.

Sharks and humans – finding a way for them to co-exist isn’t easy with politician under pressure to reduce risks – however small – for the latter. Photo: Thomas P. Peschak

While surfers are often the victims of bites, they are not necessary fans of shark culls or even nets.

Mr Fitzpatrick, the victim of Monday’s incident,told Seven Newsthat he “was just happy to be alive” but saw no need for nets.

A shark spotted swimming in the shallows near Lennox Head on October 1. Photo: Aaron Hoffman

“They’re just going to whack nets up – it feels like a kneejerk reaction [to the recent incidents],” he said, adding that “we don’t need to kill s—to make people feel better.”

Mr Fitzpatrick also objected to the use of “by-catch” to describe the animals caught in the sharknets.

“They call it by-catch to make you not feel bad that a dolphin or a whale has tangled in the net and died,” he told Channel Seven. “A beautiful marine creature’s dead just we want to feel a bit safe.”

By number of incidents, Queensland ranks second with 60 events, edging WA with 59.

Victoria recorded 16 shark bites with no fatalities over the past 26 years, while Tasmania had two deaths among the five incidents, the data showed.